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    How to fix this

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    Paddles

    Posts : 78
    Join date : 2009-12-10

    How to fix this

    Post by Paddles on Tue Mar 01, 2011 3:55 pm

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cwUUOogjhDY&feature=mfu_in_order&list=UL

    and yes I know they have a dyslexic musher who can't tell left from right! lol

    I need to know if anyone has ever seen a waddle like that, and what I can do to fix it. He is seeing a chiro

    jcsledda

    Posts : 63
    Join date : 2010-01-21
    Age : 51
    Location : St Andrews, Victoria

    Re: How to fix this

    Post by jcsledda on Wed Mar 02, 2011 4:03 pm

    Okay Paddles. Two suggestions for you. Firstly, dont run them on bitumen/concrete. The impact through their joints may well cause discomfort and long term problems. Some dogs are also very sensitive through their feet and will try and compensate for the discomfort. Secondly, let the dogs feel the line. They may well be nervous at not feeling comfortable at leaning into the harness. As the bungey goes slack, they get the feeling they are going to fall over as they dont have that security of weight pulling them back/holding them in place.

    Justin Celentane
    Snowpaw Alaskan Malamutes
    St Andrews Vic 3761
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    Snofall
    Admin

    Posts : 125
    Join date : 2009-11-16
    Age : 39
    Location : Melbourne

    Re: How to fix this

    Post by Snofall on Fri Mar 04, 2011 12:18 pm

    I'm actually not seeing anything too bad. What I am see is a dog that isn't huge enthusiastic about running in harness, and tends to get tired after a relatively short time. You see him pacing towards the end of the video, a sure sign of being either tired or uncomfortable. The dog he is running with is also not trying to push him faster than he wants to go - he's in charge of the pace.
    I second Justin in that i would not be running them on concrete, plus it can be very dangerous to run on footpaths when you can't predict when a car might be backing out of a driveway.
    A dog doesn't have to have something wrong with him to not want to break out of a trot. He may just be a stubborn dog who hasn't decided i'm not going faster than this, and that is it. Never ever under estimate a dogs will!
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    Paddles

    Posts : 78
    Join date : 2009-12-10

    Re: How to fix this

    Post by Paddles on Fri Mar 04, 2011 5:13 pm

    firstly I'd like to say, that I don't normally train on footpaths/road, we have some lovely bush tracks up here, however, Andrew, my husband and camera man, didn't feel that he could safely ride one handed and film on them (too many blasted 4 wheel drives) so we literally ran them around the block to get this on film. He's now been gone over by 2 vets and the diagnosis is more or less the same with both, his back knees are shot. he is in pain, and will certainly never race again. he's going to be on pain medication the rest of his life. He should be ok as a pet, but the ?strain? of pulling puts too much preasure on his joints. (mind you, I'm supposed to stop him going up and down cliffs too, and that will be impossible)

    Andrew, my wonderful husband, took me tonight to get another dog. (so we finally become a 3 dog family) I won't be tempted to put fred back in harness. within a few days, I'm told fred will be moving freer, and he won't be so morose as he's been. once the anti inflamatories have a chance to kick in.

    jcsledda

    Posts : 63
    Join date : 2010-01-21
    Age : 51
    Location : St Andrews, Victoria

    Re: How to fix this

    Post by jcsledda on Wed Mar 16, 2011 2:10 am

    Hi Paddles,

    So sorry to hear of that diagnosis. What has he been put on?

    One of my girls, who was diagnosed with advanced arthritis in her hocks at age 6 along with bone spurs, was put onto 4weekly rounds of cartrophen injections every six months (she is just starting another 4 week course). She kept racing up until the end of last year. I also booty her at every race to lessen the impact through her feet and after every race she is given a rimadel tablet to ease any inflammation. The initial diagnosis was made with her after I noted her running awkwardly at Goldseekers several years back. This girl is now 9 1/2, and although older, still carries on like a 2 year old! I keep her training to a minimum, and avoid hard surface training if possible as I know that this just makes things worse.

    I guess my point of all this is, dont just hang up the harness on your pooch. Alter your methods, watch and listen to your dog, and adapt if necessary.

    Good Luck.

    Justin Celentane
    Snowpaw Alaskan Malamutes
    St Andrews Vic 3761


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